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12+
Il Barbiere di Siviglia
About the performance

Verdi considered Il Barbiere “the best of the existing comic operas” and Beethoven implored the author at their meeting: “Most importantly, write more Il Barbieres! This exact opera by “the Swan of Pesaro”, the name given to Gioachino Rossini during his lifetime, became the most popular, in Russia too.

Meanwhile, its first performance turned out to be one of the most infamously strange events in the history of music: the public’s reception was less than modest. The premiere took place at the Teatro Argentina in Rome on the 20th of February 1816. Its negative reception was due in large part to the admirers of Giovanni Paisiello, the author of a great number of operas, including the work called Il Barbiere di Siviglia. There was a hum of voices in the audience, mixed with loud deliberate coughing, that the composer could not bear: he left the theatre before the end of the performance. But Rossini had tried to be respectful towards his elder colleague and changed the name of the opera. Originally, his Il Barbiere was called Almaviva, ossia l’inutile precauzione. In spite of that, the opera quickly reverted to the name by which it was destined to win the admiration of music lovers from around the world.

Premiered on 3 November 2018.

Presented with one interval.

Libretto by Cesare Sterbini after the comedy of the same name by Pierre-Augustin de Beaumarchais

Scene:
New Stage
Auditorium
Run time:
3 hours 5 minutes
Language:
Italian
The score has been made available by G. RICORDI & CO., Bühnen- und Musikverlag GmbH, Munich
Bolshoi opera official sponsor is Payment System MIR
Bogdan Mihai as Count Almaviva. 

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

Yaroslav Abaimov as Count Almaviva. Konstantin Shushakov as Figaro.

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

Bogdan Mihai as Count Almaviva. Andrzej Filończyk as Figaro.

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

Hulkar Sabirova as Rosina. 

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

Antonina Vesenina as Rosina. 

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

Boris Zhukov as Bartolo. Antonina Vesenina as Rosina. 

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

A scene from the performance. Oxana Gorchakovskaya as Berta.

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

A scene from the performance.

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

Andrzej Filończyk as Figaro. Giovanni Romeo as Bartolo. Andrei Andrianov as Ambrogio.

Photo by Yuri Bogomaz.

Ekaterina Vorontsova as Rosina. Nikolai Kazansky as Bartolo.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Nikolai Kazansky as Bartolo. Gayane Babajanyan as Rosina. Ruzil Gatin as Count Almaviva.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Josh Lovell as Count Almaviva. 

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Josh Lovell as Count Almaviva. Anna Goryachova as Rosina.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Anna Goryachova as Rosina.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Anna Goryachova as Rosina. Giovanni Romeo as Bartolo.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Stanislav Kuflyuk as Figaro.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Jose Fardilha as Bartolo. Ekaterina Vorontsova as Rosina.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Stanislav Kuflyuk as Figaro. Ekaterina Vorontsova as Rosina.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Ildar Abdrazakov as Basilio.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Ildar Abdrazakov as Basilio. Nikolai Kazansky as Bartolo.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Giovanni Romeo as Bartolo. Mikhail Kazakov as Basilio.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Yuri Syrov as Police Sergeant. Yaroslav Abaimov as Count Almaviva.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Vasily Ladyuk as Figaro. Ruzil Gatin as Count Almaviva.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Cast
05 February
2023

Sunday, 14:00

04 February
2023

Saturday, 19:00

03 February
2023

Friday, 19:00

02 February
2023

Thursday, 19:00

01 February
2023

Wednesday, 19:00

23 October
2022

Sunday, 14:00

22 October
2022

Saturday, 19:00

21 October
2022

Friday, 19:00

20 October
2022

Thursday, 19:00

19 October
2022

Wednesday, 19:00

08 May
2022

Sunday, 14:00

07 May
2022

Saturday, 19:00

06 May
2022

Friday, 19:00

05 May
2022

Thursday, 19:00

06 March
2022

Sunday, 14:00

05 March
2022

Saturday, 19:00

05 March
2022

Saturday, 12:00

Full cast list
Select date
Please note that cast is subject to change
Synopsis

Act I

Seville. Night. Count Almaviva comes to the house of Doctor Bartolo and serenades Rosina, whom Bartolo keeps confined to the house. Figaro an old friend of Count, who knows all the town’s secrets and scandals, explains to Almaviva that Rosina is Bartolo’s ward, not his daughter, and that the doctor intends to marry her. Figaro devises a plan: the count will disguise himself as a drunken soldier with orders to be quartered at Bartolo’s house so that he may gain access to Rosina. Almaviva is excited and Figaro looks forward to a nice cash pay-off.

Rosina reflects on the voice that has enchanted her and resolves to use her considerable wiles to meet the man it belongs to — as Almaviva has led her to believe, a poor student named Lindoro. Bartolo appears with Rosina’s music master, Don Basilio. Basilio warns Bartolo that Count Almaviva, who has made known his admiration for Rosina, has been seen in Seville. Bartolo decides to marry Rosina immediately. Basilio suggests slander as the most effective means of getting rid of Almaviva. Figaro, who has overheard the plot, warns Rosina and promises to deliver a note from her to Lindoro. Bartolo suspects that Rosina has indeed written a letter, but she outwits him at every turn. Bartolo warns her not to trifle with him.

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