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12+
Spartacus
About the performance

In the 1950s, the stage rehearsals of a new ballet were taking place simultaneously in Moscow and Leningrad. At the Bolshoi, Spartacus was being prepared by Igor Moiseyev, at the Kirov Opera and Ballet Theatre (now Mariinsky) by Leonid Jakobson. The Leningrad premiere was given on the 27th of December 1956 and forestalled the Moscow one by almost two years. The latter was staged on the 11th of March 1958. At the premiere, the role of Aegina was danced by Maya Plisetskaya and Harmodius by Nikolai Fadeyechev. Moiseyev’s version was performed only six times during one season and then disappeared from the stage for ever.

Jacobson had reconsidered and enriched his Leningrad version, and transferred his production to the Bolshoi Theatre in 1962. Both primary references to Spartacus turned out to be just a small step towards the grand success that was to await the production by Yuri Grigorovich. The premiere of the world-famous ballet Spartacus, that has become a calling card of the Bolshoi Theatre, took place on the 9th of April 1968.

Premiered on April 9, 1968.

Libretto by Yuri Grigorovich after the novel of the same name by Raffaello Giovagnolli, ideas from the scenario by Nikolai Volkov used

Designer
Simon Virsaladze
Lighting Designer
Mikhail Sokolov
Scene:
Historic Stage
Auditorium
Run time:
3 hours 5 minutes
Anastasia Denisova as Phrygia. Denis Rodkin as Spartacus.

Photo by Natalia Voronova.

Svetlana Zakharova as Aegina. Artemy Belyakov as Crassus.

Photo by Natalia Voronova.

Igor Tsvirko as Spartacus.

Photo by Mikhail Logvinov.

Artemy Belyakov as Crassus.

Photo by Natalia Voronova.

Act 2 Scene 5th. The Appian Way.

Photo by Elena Fetisova

Ekaterina Shipulina as Aegina.

Photo by Mikhail Logvinov.

Anna Nikulina as Phrygia. Mikhail Lobukhin as Spartacus.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Olga Marchenkova as Aegina.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Nina Kaptsova as Phrygia. Igor Tsvirko as Spartacus.

Photo by Mikhail Logvinov.

Svetlana Zakharova as Aegina.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Vladislav Lantratov as Crassus.

Photo by Natalia Voronova.

Ekaterina Shipulina as Aegina. Ruslan Skvortsov as Crassus.

Photo by Mikhail Logvinov.

Act 3 Scene 12th. The Last Battle.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Requiem. Anastasia Stashkevich as Phrygia.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Requiem. Nina Kaptsova as Phrygia. Mikhail Lobukhin as Spartacus.

Photo by Elena Fetisova.

Cast
02 February
2023

Thursday, 19:00

01 February
2023

Wednesday, 19:00

31 January
2023

Tuesday, 19:00

25 September
2022

Sunday, 14:00

24 September
2022

Saturday, 19:00

24 September
2022

Saturday, 12:00

03 June
2022

Friday, 19:00

02 June
2022

Thursday, 19:00

01 June
2022

Wednesday, 19:00

08 May
2022

Sunday, 14:00

07 May
2022

Saturday, 19:00

07 May
2022

Saturday, 12:00

06 May
2022

Friday, 19:00

02 April
2022

Saturday, 19:00

02 April
2022

Saturday, 12:00

01 April
2022

Friday, 19:00

09 January
2022

Sunday, 19:00

Full cast list
Select date
Please note that cast is subject to change
Synopsis

Act I

Scene 1

Invasion.

The military machine of imperial Rome, led by Crassus, wages a cruel campaign of conquest, destroying everything in its path. Among the chained prisoners, who are doomed to slavery, are Spartacus and Phrygia.

Spartacus’s Monologue.

Spartacus is in despair. Born a free man, he is now a slave in chains.

Scene 2

The Slave Market.

Slave dealers separate the men and women prisoners for sale to rich Romans. Spartacus is parted from Phrygia.

Phrygia’s Monologue.

Phrygia is overcome with grief. She thinks with horror of the terrifying ordeals that lie ahead of her.

Schedule and tickets
Date
Tickets
Price
Time
31 January
Tuesday
0
0
19:00
1 February
Wednesday
0
0
19:00
2 February
Thursday
0
0
19:00
General partner of the Bolshoi Theater — insurance company «Ingosstrakh»
Privileged partner of the Bolshoi Theater — GUM