Ballet by John Cranko in three acts
Onegin

to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Ballet in one act
Carmen Suite

to music by Georges Bizet and Rodion Shchedrin

Ballet in two acts
The Sleeping Beauty

Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Ballet in three acts
Romeo and Juliet

Sergei Prokofiev

Ballet in two acts
Giselle

Adolphe Adam

Ballet in three acts
Le Corsaire

Adolphe Adam

Ballet in two acts
A Hero of Our Time

Ilya Demutsky

Ballet in three acts
A Legend of Love

Arif Melikov

One-act ballets program
Four Characters in Search of a Plot

Ballet in three acts
Spartacus

Aram Khachaturyan

Ballet in two acts
The Flames of Paris

Boris Asafiev

Ballet in one act
Les Saisons

Alexander Glazunov

Ballet by John Neumeier in two acts based on the novel of the same name by Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina

to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky Alfred Shnitke, Cat Stevens / Yusuf Islam

Ballet in two acts
La Sylphide

Herman Severin Levenskiold

Ballet in three acts
La Fille du Pharaon

Cesare Pugni

Ballet in three acts
Don Quixote

Ludwig Minkus

Ballet in three acts
Raymonda

Alexander Glazunov

Ballet in two acts
Master and Margarita

to music by Alfred Schnitke

Ballet in two acts
Swan Lake

Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Ballet in four acts
The Seagull

Ilya Demutsky

Ballet in one act
Dancemania

Yuri Krasavin

Ballet in one act
Made in Bolshoi

to music by Anatoly Korolyov

Ballet in two acts
Anyuta

to music by Valery Gavrilin

Ballet by George Balanchine in three parts
Jewels

to music by Gabriel Fauré, Igor Stravinsky, Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Ballet in three acts
La Bayadère

Ludwig Minkus

Ballet in one act
Chopiniana

to music by Frederic Chopin

Grand Pas from the ballet Paquita

Ludvig Minkus

Ballet in two acts
Ivan the Terrible

to music by Sergei Prokofiev

Ballet in three acts
Coppelia

Leo Delibes

Ballet in two acts
The Taming of the Shrew

to music by Dmitri Shostakovich

Ballet by Christian Spuck in two acts
Orlando

to music by Edward Elgar, Philip Glass, Lera Auerbach and Eleha Kats-Chernin

Ballet in two acts
The Nutcracker

Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Ballet by Christopher Wheeldon in three acts with a prologue
The Winter’s Tale

Joby Talbot

12+
Le Corsaire
About the performance

The premiere of the ballet Le Corsaire took place of the 23rd of January 1856 at the Paris Opera. The libretto, based on the poem by G. Byron, was written by Jules Henri Vernoy de Saint-Georges and the choreographer of the production Joseph Mazilier. The music was composed by the author of Giselle, Adolphe Adam. In 1867, Pas de fleurs to music by Leo Delibes was also included in the ballet.

Two years after the world premiere, on the 12th of January 1858, the ballet was shown in Russia for the first time: Jules Perrot transferred it to the stage of the Bolshoi (Kamenny) Theatre in St Petersburg, having kept the Parisian libretto but renewed the choreography. In the same theatre season, Marius Petipa choreographed Pas d'Esclaves to music by Pyotr von Oldenburg for the first scene and it started the tradition of including so called additional pieces to this ballet, numbers of which have been collected in excessive quantities over its long stage life.

Premiered on June 21, 2007.

Libretto by Jules Henri Vernoy de Saint-Georges and Joseph Mazilier edited by Marius Petipa

Choreography: Marius Petipa

The Bolshoi Theatre production

Use is made in the production of music by Leo Delibes, Cesare Pugni, Pyotr von Oldenburg, Riccardo Drigo, Albert Zabel, Julius Gerber.

Music dramaturgy conception — Yuri Burlaka

Score restored by Alexander Troitsky

The original score by Adolphe Adam/Leo Delibes for Le Corsaire has been made available by L’Opera national de Paris from the archives of La Bibliotheque nationale de France

The choreographic notation has been made available by the Harvard University Theatre Collection

Evgeny Ponomaryov’s costume sketches (1899) used in the production have been made available by the St. Petersburg State Theatre Library

Scene:
Historic Stage
Auditorium
Run time:
3 hours 35 minutes
Synopsis

Act I

Scene 1

Medora is Kidnapped

The bazaar square. The beautiful slave-girls who are up for sale, sit awaiting buyers; here too throngs a crowd of Turks, Greeks, Armenians who are examining the wares brought from all corners of the earth.

A band of corsairs appear in the square, led by Conrad. He has evidently come to the bazaar to carry out his secret plan to meet a certain beautiful stranger.

Medora, the ward of bazaar-owner Isaac Lanquedem, comes out onto the balcony of her guardian’s house. Seeing Conrad, she quickly makes a selam* out of the flowers she has to hand and throws it to him. The latter, reading the selam is delighted, because now he is convinced the beautiful Medora loves him.

General partner of the Bolshoi Theater — insurance company «Ingosstrakh»
Privileged partner of the Bolshoi Theater — GUM