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Yuri Krasavin

Ballet by John Neumeier in two acts based on the novel of the same name by Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina

to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky Alfred Shnitke, Cat Stevens / Yusuf Islam

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Joby Talbot

Ballet in three acts
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Leo Delibes

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to music by Gabriel Fauré, Igor Stravinsky, Pyotr Tchaikovsky

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Ludwig Minkus

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Ludwig Minkus

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Made in Bolshoi

to music by Anatoly Korolyov

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Alexander Glazunov

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Ilya Demutsky

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Orlando

to music by Edward Elgar, Philip Glass, Lera Auerbach and Eleha Kats-Chernin

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Boris Asafiev

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Four Characters in Search of a Plot

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Pyotr Tchaikovsky

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Ludvig Minkus

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Aram Khachaturyan

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Pyotr Tchaikovsky

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Adolphe Adam

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Cesare Pugni

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to music by Valery Gavrilin

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Herman Severin Levenskiold

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to music by Alfred Schnitke

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Alexander Glazunov

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to music by Georges Bizet and Rodion Shchedrin

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Arif Melikov

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Pyotr Tchaikovsky

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to music by Dmitri Shostakovich

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Sergei Prokofiev

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Adolphe Adam

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to music by Sergei Prokofiev

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Ilya Demutsky

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Adolphe Adam

6+
The Sleeping Beauty
About the performance

The premiere of the ballet The Sleeping Beauty took place at the Mariinsky Theatre on the 3rd of January 1890. It was the time of the unchallenged reign of Marius Petipa in Russian ballet, a Frenchman who created the phenomenon of Russian classical ballet out of an average European troupe that has remained vivid for over a century.

It was possible mainly due to the cooperation of the ballet master with Tchaikovsky, whose symphonic music helped to develop and enrich the forms and contents of classical ballet. The Sleeping Beauty was their first joint work. Petipa, who by then had been perfecting the form of large-scale narrative ballets for over half a century, provided Tchaikovsky with a detailed plan that had a disposition for every musical piece, including its length precisely to the bar. Tchaikovsky responded to that with such diverse musical structures and melodies, that made Petipa overcome long established customs and look for new forms.

The new choreographic version premiered on November 18, 2011.

Libretto by Ivan Vsevolozhsky and Marius Petipa

Choreography: Marius Petipa

Scenery
Ezio Frigerio
Costume Designer
Franca Squarciapino
Lighting Designer
Vinicio Cheli
Assistant Designer
Leila Fteita
Assistant Designer
Oscar Cafaro
Assistant Costume Designer
Laura Lo Surdo
Scene:
Historic Stage
Auditorium
Run time:
2 hours 45 minutes
David Hallberg as Prince Desire. Svetlana Zakharova as Princess Aurora.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Svetlana Zakharova as Princess Aurora. David Hallberg as Prince Desire.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Svetlana Zakharova as Princess Aurora. David Hallberg as Prince Desire.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Svetlana Zakharova as Princess Aurora. David Hallberg as Prince Desire.

Photo by Damir Yusupov.

Synopsis

Prologue

In the palace of King Florestan XIV the birth of his daughter, Princess Aurora, is being celebrated. Master of Ceremonies Catalabutte is checking the invitation list. The Lilac Fairy and Good Fairies appear among the courtiers and the guests coming to congratulate the Princess. They bring the newborn infant gifts, endowing her with the finest human attributes. Suddenly, a great noise is heard. The evil and powerful Carabosse Fairy drives into the ballroom with her repulsive suite. They forgot to invite her to the birth celebration. An irate Carabosse predicts that Aurora will die young from pricking her finger with a knitting spindle. But the Lilac Fairy intervenes: she predicts that the forces of good will neutralize the sinister spell. With a peremptory gesture, she forces Carabosse to leave the palace.

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Privileged partner of the Bolshoi Theater — GUM